Aus Botanical Research Institute

Australia has many unique frangipani which where originally introduced to the remAote wilderness areas of tropical Australia by early Christian missionaries from Polynesia and Melanesia. In recent years we have been importing the best frangipani varieties and wild species from around the world as well as breeding our own unique varieties.Aus Botanical Research Institute has the biggest collection of evergreen frangipani species in Australia and offers our customers the worlds best ornamental evergreen species - these are exceptional landscaping plants. 
About the name "Frangipani"
Frangipani is the most common name for Plumeria in Australia. In most other English language speaking parts of the world, frangipani are called Plumeria. Plumeria is the botanically correct name. The name frangipani is an English derivative of the French name Frangipanier. The common old English name was "nosegay". And what a delight to the nose it is in hot weather when the multitude of fragrant blooms fill the air with it's heady perfume. The botanical name for frangipani is Plumeria, named in honour of French botanist
​About Australian Frangipani / Plumeria
and explorer Charles Plumier, 1646 - 1706, who studied the frangipani and introduced it into cultivation in Europe. All frangipani, the many cultivated varieties and the wild species belong to the genus Plumeria. A dense crowned compact semi dwarf tree growing to 2m x 2m max. Huge 4" flowers of excellent color, patternation, shape and perfume. An exceptional frangipani for large pots or as a small main feature tree in the garden landscape or low border hedges/screens. A stunning newly imported frangipani hybrid. Exceptional colors, pattern, petal shape, flower size and petal texture. Rare! Aus Botanical Research Institute has the largest collection of rare wild Frangipani (Plumeria species) in Australia. These are mostly very rare species offered for the first time. All of these species are evergreen/non-deciduous and are resistant to the Frangipani pests and diseases. Some species are available in limited supply only.


Article from http://anpsa.org.au/sgap1a.html

What is an Australia Native Plant
An Australian native plant is any plant indigenous to Australia as included in the Australian. Plant Census except those identified therein as naturalized. An Australian native plant also includes any hybrid or cultivar in which all parents are Australian native plants. An Australian plant native to a particular state of Australia is any plant indigenous to that state, as included in the Australian Plant Census except those identified therein as naturalized. An Australian plant native to a particular state of Australia also includes any hybrid or cultivar in which all parents are Australian plants native to that state of Australia. Plant Name Changes Taxonomy is that section of botany which is concerned with the valid naming of plants. Often botanists who are studying a particular group of plants will find that the relationships between individual species (or genera) are different to what has been previously published or that the previously published names are invalid for one reason or another. As a result, this research may lead to name changes resulting from:
​- Old, invalid names being replaced (eg. Banksia prostrata became Banksia gardneri).
- Previous sub-species or varieties being raised to species status (eg. Banksia integrifolia variety aquilonia became Banksia aquilonia). A national database of plant names.
A major problem in dealing with plant names is that some Australian herbaria will accept a particular revised taxonomy while others do not. A current example is the acceptance by several State herbaria of the re-classification of Callistemon to Melaleuca while others have retained both genera as distinct.
The name Acacia aulacocarpa is still current but has been widely misapplied and a number of forms previously referred to as A.aulacocarpa have now been transferred to other species. The form from coastal and near coastal areas of south-east Queensland and northern New South Wales (and the one most commonly referred to as A.aulacocarpa in the past) is now A.disparrima. Several species formerly included in the genus Helichrysum were transferred to the new genus Bracteantha in 1991. However, it has recently (2001) been discovered that the name Xerochrysum, published by a Russian botanist in 1990, must take precedence under the rules of botanical nomenclature. This means that Bracteantha bracteatum and B.subundulata (and several other species) are now reclassified under the genus Xe.
The database has been developed with emphasis on plant characteristics in Mediterranean to semi-arid climatic conditions. It will best relate to South Australian conditions, and is reasonably close for Western Australia and Victoria. However, it may be less accurate for eastern seaboard environments. Early on in the Society's history it was realised that knowledge about the cultivation of Australian native plants was very limited and there was little published information available. One way to help overcome this deficiency was to set up specialist Study Groups whose aim was to record the successes (and failures) of growing Australian species in various localities. Over the years these Groups have contributed valuable data which is assisting today's growers. But there is still a great deal to learn...


Article from http://anpsa.org.au/sgap1a.html